To Develop and Pilot a Best Practice Community Pharmacy Chlamydia Screening Model


Project Details
Project ID: IIG-003
Type: Investigator Initiated
Status: Completed
Institution: University of Western Australia
Chief Investigator: Dr Rhonda Clifford

Project Summary

Background

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) notified in Australia. The study objectives were:

1. To develop a pharmacy-based Chlamydia screening model; and
2. To conduct a 6-month feasibility from 20 pharmacies in Perth.

Methods

A pharmacy-based Chlamydia screening model was developed through literature review and stakeholder consensus. Pharmacists identified all consumers requesting emergency contraception (EC) with symptoms of STIs and referred them a physician. Asymptomatic women were provided with a free Chlamydia testing kit. All returned samples were analysed through a pathology service and the results were sent to a sexual health physician. Quantitative and qualitative analysis was undertaken to assess the uptake of ECOMPACT, and understand the consumers and pharmacists’ perspectives.

Results

The Emergency Contraception Mediated Pharmacy Access of Chlamydia Testing (ECOMPACT) model was developed. From 769 EC consultations, the pharmacists’ successfully recruited 596 (78%) consumers and 247 (41%) participated.

Pharmacists successfully identified almost 15% of EC consumers to have symptoms of STIs. Pharmacists requested Chlamydia pathology tests for the 166 asymptomatic and eligible women. They were given information (health promotion) on Chlamydia screening and an ECOMPACT Testing Kit (diagnostic and long-term prevention). 46 (28%) consumers tested themselves for Chlamydia, with negative results.

Conclusion

ECOMPACT used existing infrastructure within the pharmacy to provide Chlamydia screening to a discrete population that already access pharmacy services. This study has established evidence that the EC consumer target group is at high risk of Chlamydia and that pharmacy-based Chlamydia screening is highly feasible in Australia.